What research says about why mindfulness matters

It can be easy to rush through our days (and nights) without stopping to observe much.

Being more mindful of (and attentive to) our here and now (the present moment) – to our own thoughts and feelings, and to the world around us – can improve our mental wellbeing.

1. Here is what the Harvard guys say.

https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2018/04/harvard-researchers-study-how-mindfulness-may-change-the-brain-in-depressed-patients/

https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2018/04/less-stress-clearer-thoughts-with-mindfulness-meditation/

https://wellness.huhs.harvard.edu/Mindfulness

2. Here is what the NHS guys say.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/basics/mindfulness

3. “Why is it that some people are more vulnerable to life’s slings and arrows and others more resilient?” In this TED talk, Richard Davidson discusses how mindfulness can improve well-being and outlines strategies to boost four components of a healthy mind: awareness, connection, insight, and purpose. Davidson is William James and Vilas professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CBfCW67xT8

4. In this TED talk, Dr. Shauna Shapiro draws on modern neuroscience and ancient wisdom to demonstrate how mindfulness can help us make positive changes in our brains and our lives. Shapiro is a professor at Santa Clara University, a clinical psychologist, and an internationally recognized expert in mindfulness.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/theory-knowledge/201502/what-is-mindfulness-and-how-does-it-work

5. Can you go from feeling stressed to calm in under 30 seconds? Phil Boissiere shares his simple technique to bring mindfulness to your busy life, any time, anywhere. Phil Boissiere is an adult ADHD and couples counseling specialist based in the San Francisco Bay Area.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ad7HqXEc2Sc

6. Is the practice of mindfulness just for zen masters and yoga afficionados? 35 years of scientific research proves this practice of non-judgemental present moment awareness effectively boosts not only creativity, performance and productivity, but also cultivates kindness, compassion, generosity and empathy. It is no surprise that hundreds of major corporations are offering mindfulness-based interventions to their employees. Charity Bryant is a trained Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Teacher by The Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care and Society, UMASS Medical School.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1m-uc6CRB6k

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